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Flashing through thunderclouds in space; time, barriers, just seem to dissolve as we move forth into the Divine. From dimension to dimension.



ebony-eden:

Atrium, 2013
screen print, watercolour 

ebony-eden:

Atrium, 2013

screen print, watercolour 

"I love that sweet smell of decay that surrounds me in forests and woods. A kind of mulchy, deep, rich rot that has no connotation of death or ending, but rather of life and age. A sense of perpetual destruction and rebirth."

— (via wadulisiwoman)

(via mirroir)

gazophylacium:

Heart Scarab


The Egyptians viewed the heart as the seat of intellect and emotion; as such, it played a central role in the rebirth of an individual in the afterlife. The heart of the individual was weighed against the feather representing the goddess of truth, Ma’at, in a judgment process overseen by Osiris, the lord of the underworld. The judgment was a frequent subject for funerary art, especially on papyri and coffins. Central to the scene was a large balance, with the heart in one pan and either a feather or a tiny figure of Ma’at, in the other pan. In most scenes, a demon called Ammit, “the Devourer,” crouches below the balance, anxiously awaiting the outcome. Should the heart of the deceased prove to be heavy with wrongdoing, it would be eaten by the demon, and the hope of an afterlife vanished. Oddly enough, the Egyptians never seem to have depicted the negative outcome of the weighing, only the joyful individual being received by Osiris and presented with offerings.
It was crucial that the heart remain with the body during the mummification process, in order to be present for the judgment. A protective amulet or heart scarab was typically wrapped with the mummy, in case the heart should be damaged or removed. Such amulets were frequently inscribed with a spell to prevent the heart from bearing false witness against the deceased before Osiris.

gazophylacium:

Heart Scarab

The Egyptians viewed the heart as the seat of intellect and emotion; as such, it played a central role in the rebirth of an individual in the afterlife. The heart of the individual was weighed against the feather representing the goddess of truth, Ma’at, in a judgment process overseen by Osiris, the lord of the underworld. The judgment was a frequent subject for funerary art, especially on papyri and coffins. Central to the scene was a large balance, with the heart in one pan and either a feather or a tiny figure of Ma’at, in the other pan. In most scenes, a demon called Ammit, “the Devourer,” crouches below the balance, anxiously awaiting the outcome. Should the heart of the deceased prove to be heavy with wrongdoing, it would be eaten by the demon, and the hope of an afterlife vanished. Oddly enough, the Egyptians never seem to have depicted the negative outcome of the weighing, only the joyful individual being received by Osiris and presented with offerings.

It was crucial that the heart remain with the body during the mummification process, in order to be present for the judgment. A protective amulet or heart scarab was typically wrapped with the mummy, in case the heart should be damaged or removed. Such amulets were frequently inscribed with a spell to prevent the heart from bearing false witness against the deceased before Osiris.

(Source: carlos.emory.edu)

bluishtigers:

i think i saw this around the east village

bluishtigers:

i think i saw this around the east village

(via fox-party)

"Everyone wants to live on top of the mountain, but all the happiness and growth occurs while you’re climbing it."

— Andy Rooney (via fuckyeahyoga)
You want the sunshine you’re gonna have to deal with the rain bruh 👍☀️☔️✨

(Source: irockirockirock, via elige)

world-shaker:

[leaves this here and backs away]

world-shaker:

[leaves this here and backs away]

(via elige)

"It’s dark because you are trying too hard. Lightly child, lightly. Learn to do everything lightly. Yes, feel lightly even though you’re feeling deeply. Just lightly let things happen and lightly cope with them. I was so preposterously serious in those days…Lightly, lightly—it’s the best advice ever given me. So throw away your baggage and go forward. There are quicksands all about you, sucking at your feet, trying to suck you down into fear and self-pity and despair. That’s why you must walk so lightly. Lightly, my darling."

— Aldous Huxley  (via versteur)

(Source: sol-psych, via nectarblood)

indophilia:

Hanuman in the back streets of Kolkata

indophilia:

Hanuman in the back streets of Kolkata

(Source: jorgenkube.de, via doommantra)

"It is easy in the world to live after the world’s opinion; it is easy in solitude to live after our own; but the great man is he who in the midst of the crowd keeps with perfect sweetness the independence of solitude."

— Ralph Waldo Emerson

(Source: quotes-shape-us, via cosmofilius)

xsageandspirit:

"Kundalini" energy rising through the spine into the third eye and above

xsageandspirit:

"Kundalini" energy rising through the spine into the third eye and above

(via star-seed)

aqni:

i drew a bug

aqni:

i drew a bug

(via postsmatch)

"Love isn’t soft, like those poets say. Love has teeth which bite and the wounds never close."

Stephen King (via loveage-moondream)

(Source: wordsthat-speak, via daddyfuckedme)

"How many nights must it take
one such as me to learn
that we aren’t, after all, made
from that bird that flies out of its ashes,
that for us
as we go up in flames, our one work
is
to open ourselves, to be
the flames?
"

— Galway Kinnell, Another Night in Ruins (via requiemforthepast)

(via 0aklungs)